Blitz Brigade Unlimited Diamond Possible?

A while ago I started playing Blitz Brigade, which is a cool game on mobile devices, for both android and ios, especially if you are a FPS lover like me. 

The art direction of the game takes inspiration from cartoony game like Team Fortress 2, WoW as such. While the theme is based around World War II and have a close game mechanics to Battlefield: Heroes.

So I played the game like any nerd gamer for a few month, than I was really fed up. Why? Well, one thing that I can't stand the most is the current F2P module on mobile. They love to give you free games, which is nice, but the Pay-to-Win module that arises from selling 'cheats' to other player to get certain advantage.

I thought, why the hell should we pay for that environment. I went to Google and found myself a working hack. I'm just a regular PC user but the hack that I found allows you to have unlimited Diamonds and Coins in the game which is perfect! The method tho somehow is really tricky, they include a few guides in which can help you device your own hack. There's also modded APK and DEB that allow you to have speed hack and non gravity jump, I bet the other players would be shock to see me doing that. Although to do this, you would have to have a jailbroken or rooted device. But things like that is extremely easy to do right?

You can check out the hack at Playberries: www.Playberries.com Unlike any fake online hack shit that I tried, answering their stupid survey which has not actual result, you may want to invest some time and download their tool pack and do some manual hacking. Trust me, it's where the real fun begin. 

Check out and downlod the game at iTunes or Google Play Store Now you can have real fun with Blitz Brigade! 

Bastion Review

This is an old-school RPG—in the best way possible. The Kid, the game's youthful hero, is on a quest to restore the Bastion and put his fragmented world back in order. Adventuring is broken up by Diablo-esque combat, which rewards players with items and XP.

 

Independent developer Supergiant Games has created a vivid, hand-drawn world to explore, and as you wander the decimated landscape, you’re accompanied by the voice of an unseen narrator. As you move about, the environment begins to rebuild itself around your footsteps; paths and branching areas open up, and the gameworld literally comes to life. This is the work of a small team, and there’s soul in every pixel.

It’s tough to find a reason not to like Bastion. Early in the game, as you begin to wander and the environment starts to evolve, the narrator digs in his hooks: "Ground firms up ‘round his feet; he don’t stop to wonder why." The hand-drawn isometric graphics recall a kinder, gentler era of videogames, and combat is effortless yet challenging, hinged on the player’s ability to transition between attacks and defensive maneuvers. Enemies are varied and bosses massive, all of which should add up to a rather transcendent interactive fairytale.

 

Bastion

The Legend of Zelda: Skyward Sword Review

Link returns in his second Wii outing—and this time, it’s a proper one instead of a GameCube port. Unlike Twilight Princess and its tacked-on motion controls, Skyward Sword was designed specifically for the Wii from the very beginning, using technology from Wii Sports Resort.

Most Zelda games are standalone quests featuring various Links and Zeldas from several unconnected worlds. Skyward Sword is different in that it’s an actual prequel to Ocarina of Time—and also because it features a new flying mechanism where Link takes to skies on the back of a gigantic bird. What sailing did for Wind Waker, aerial adventures could do the same for Skyward Sword.

It’s great to see a new Zelda game invoke a classic like Ocarina of Time—I think the various Zelda adventures can feel a bit too disconnected from each other. But the Ocarina comparisons also hurt Skyward Sword, as the art and game world just don’t feel quite as vibrant here.

I also found the flying controls a bit frustrating during my hands-on time at E3—a bad sign if these segments play as large a role in this game as Wind Waker's sailing did in that adventure. But what can you say...

 

 

The Legend of ZeldaSkyward Sword

Journey Review

The makers of cult hits flOw and Flower take their first stab at a true “game,” offering up an /co-inspired tale of a silent stranger's travels in an intimate, mysterious land. Who are you? Why are you there? Where are you going? Who wilt you encounter? This, my friends, is Journey.

While most titles seem content to hack, slash, and demolish their way to a blockbuster finish, Journey seeks to push the boundaries of how and why we play. Deliberate, patient, and undeniably artistic in both its vision and execution, this game will certainly offer something different.

Screens and videos are one thing, but my hands-on time with Journey at E3 revealed a game whose simplicity, style, and solemnness are a welcome change amidst the flood of mass-produced bloodbaths that define modern gaming. Its novel universe, clever cooperative play, and user-driven score don’t hurt, either.

And this particular qoute from Journey, is just spot on, which just tells you a whole lot a bout the mood of the game itself.

 

Prey 2 Review

U.S. Marshal Killian Samuels takes the place of Prey’s Tommy, as the hunted now becomes the hunter. In this open-world setting of the future—developer Human Head calls their vision “alien noir”—you’re a lone bounty hunter tracking your targets across the dusky, unsettling city of Exodus.

There's much more to Prey 2  than a first-person shooter in an alien world. If you think it’s the right move, keeping your gun holstered could prove more powerful than choosing mass chaos. Interrogation, slick gadgets, and navigation are key points, with moments of exploration giving you downtime to work through this compelling setting.

The climbing abilities employed to sneak through the vertically constructed Exodus look like a blast—especially the vertiginous leaps extended to great heights with the hoverboots. The game’s sole emphasis on single-player, reinforced by project lead Chris Rhinehart’s desire to put all resources into the narrative and open-world pull of the solo experience, looks even keener the more I see of this strikingly futuristic adventure.

If you ever imagine half-life has a crossover to a game like metal gear solid, this would be the game.

 

Prey 2

Catherine Review

Under pressure to marry his girlfriend, Katherine, 32-year-old Vincent Brooks is trying to decide his fate one day while sitting in a local bar. Unfortunately for him, fate has other plans in store and throws a young, beautiful blonde into the mix named—oddly enough—Catherine. Vincent must not only survive the love triangle he suddenly finds himself entangled in, but also the strange dreams of death that suddenly begin to haunt him at night.

Catherine is the first Atlus title produced for the current generation of HD consoles—and, true to their heritage, they’ve put together something with ample amounts of style and novelty. The game mixes fast-action puzzle-platform stages with heavy doses of storyline and character development; it’s a strategy of genre combination that certainly worked out well for another Atlus franchise in Persona 3 and 4.

Having played the demo, I already knew Catherine’s gameplay was as intriguing as its premise, but E3 gave me the option to try something I wasn’t expecting: multiplayer. While the focus is still on the story-infused single-player mode, it’s a surprisi fun bonus.

If you like fantasizing the creepiest hot chick (nothing against it), maybe you will like this.

 

Catherine

5 Things You Wish You'd Know About Infamous 2

Infamous, with a name like Sucker Punch, the folks behind the Infamous and Sly Cooper games clearly have a sense of humor about their jobs. Or they just like smacking people when they're not expecting it. Either way, they undoubtedly sneak things into their games for their own amusement, as well as yours. Which is why we cornered Darren Bridges, lead designer on Infamous 2, to fill us in on the secret stuff. And, yes pun fans, we told him not to pull any punches.

  1. Teach Your Children Well
    We expect our fathers to set good examples for us, to teach us right from wrong, to be good citizens, good people. Thankfully, for people who play Infamous 2, this isn’t always the case. "When we were trying to decide where to set the game," Bridges explains, “our game director Nate Fox was excited about setting it in a New Orleans-type city because his dad grew up In New Orleans and used to tell Nate about all the hijinks he got into in the city as a kid." The result: Infamous 2's setting, the N’awlins-iike New Marais.
  2. Dirty Movies
    Aside from the cutscenes, you’ll also find some Sucker Punch people hidden in a part of the game they might not want to tell their grandmothers about. “There are some inside jokes in an area that’s basically the city’s red-light district,” Bridges says. “For example, we put some pictures of people who worked on Infamous 2 on some movie posters. Though, there are also some references to other games. There’s one theater, for instance, where the marquee says that the movie they’re showing is Uncharted Love."
  3. Good Times, Bad Times
    In Infamous 2. like the original, you can either play as a good guy or as a bad guy. But while you might expect the split to be pretty even when it comes to people deciding to be naughty or nice. Bridges says that wasn’t actually the case. “It was a super-high percentage of good guys, especially on the first playthrough." he says of the split on the orginal. “I thought it was going to be much closer to 50%. but it actually wound up being 80/20 good." Maybe there's hope for us yet.
  4. Reckless Records
    Like with many games, the animators working on Infamous 2 used motion-capture technology to make sure the characters moved tike real people. And, again, like with many games, someone inevitably got hurt doing this. The first time we got the mocap suit." Bridges chuckles, “our lead animator, Billy Harper, put It on and went out to a park with his kids. And he tried to do some parkour, but he ended up falling backward on some concrete. After  that, they tried to be less reckless."
  5. Story Mode
    One big addition to Infamous 2 is the user-created-mission mode. Not surprisingly, the testers built more missions in the first week than the developers had made in two years. Though Bridges admits some of those modes did surprise him. There was one called Zeke's Story," he recalls, “in which (protagonist Cole MacGrath] and [sidekick Zeke Dunbar] are talking to these two girls about something that happened. And as Zeke recounts the story, you play through it. But the whole time. Cole’s constantly saying. ‘No, it wasn’t like that; there were more guys,’ which changes what you have to do."

Infamous 2